How To Fight Speeding Tickets

Speeding tickets are no fun. If you are pulled over for speeding and issued a citation legally, you do not need a lawyer unless you were also driving recklessly and are also cited for reckless driving. Speeding tickets are fairly straight forward, for the most part. However, depending on how much over the speed limit you were driving and which state you live in, your vehicle could be impounded (typically 40 mph over the speed limit). Additionally in some states, if you are under 18, your license may become suspended. But, if none of these conditions apply to you, you have the right to do two things: either pay the ticket, usually through mail, or else dispute the charge against you. After becoming aware of the law, I learned that anyone who pleads guilty on speeding tickets where they were cited for not speeding at all or cited for not going too much over the speed limit, subjects himself to unnecessary punishment from the law, since most speeding tickets of this type can be dismissed. I had a friend who was once cited for speeding when he was not and decided to fight the ticket. So how do I fight a speeding ticket if I don’t think I was speeding? Courts do not like to waste time and taxpayer dollars on petty crimes. To dispute a speeding ticket, you must within 10 days in most instances either sign the portion of the ticket that says “not guilty” and mail it to the place where you would send the payment for the fine or write a letter of dispute with the ticket number included in the letter, as well as your reasons for disputing the charges. In the written dispute, you must include ticket numbers, the date the ticket was received, the “act and section of the defense,” and your personal information. Thus, it depends on the state, but for the most part, states have a writing address where the dispute can be mailed. Check with your local county clerk to learn where to mail the dispute form. After you have completed the dispute form, you will then wait to hear from the proper authorities,...

Auto Injury Accident Compensation

Most road traffic accident compensation involves two drivers, with a driver or passenger from the one vehicle seeking compensation from the driver of the second vehicle. Based on evidence that the accident was caused through negligence. The road traffic accident compensation claim will lead to legal proceedings that will involve the driver and possibly, passengers of both vehicles claiming injury as a result of the negligent driving on one the parties behalf . Typically, legal proceedings due to poor road design, will be against a local council. This can be on the basis that they to have failed to install proper signs maintained proper design or maintain a A road, high street or motorway. A road traffic accident compensation claim may also include a product liability claim lodged toward the manufacturer of a car or car part, claiming design or manufacturing defect which lead to the accident. Also, if a car mechanic or garage left a car in an unsafe condition, liability may fall within their responsibility. Unique situations can often arise in a road traffic accident compensation claim which make the legal proceedings more difficult. All parties involved may be liable for potential injuries and this will be considered during the course of any legal proceeding. Various issues that can arise from the accident itself include: Leaving the scene of an accident: Is not so uncommon in the UK where the driver who causes an accident fails to stop at the place of the accident. This will make it difficult for the injured party involved make a positive ID and therefore bring the driver to court. Pedestrians and Road Accidents: In such situations, a member of the public can suffer serious injuries as a result of a collision with a vehicle. Often time the conduct of the pedestrian is called into question making it difficult to make a claim against the driver. Motorbike & Car Accidents: Motorcyclists are very much at risk in regards to personal injury when involved in a road traffic accident, even in collisions which would be relatively minor had they occurred between cars. Due to the nature of some motorcyclists, it may be prove difficult to obtain a far...

What Is A Judgment Lien?

A judgement lien is a court ordered lien that is placed against the home or property when the homeowner simply fails to pay a debt. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but when the homeowner has a judgement lien against his or her home and wants to sell it, the judgement lien has to be paid in full before the home or property can be sold. judgement liens can be placed against the property for a variety of reasons such as unpaid credit card bills, utility bills, department store bills, landscaping or home improvement bills, and just about any bill that the homeowner has failed to pay in a reasonable amount of time. Any bill that can cause one to end up in court can result in a judgement lien. A judgement lien is different than a trust, in that the judgement lien holder cannot foreclose on the home or the property as trust holder can. judgement lien holders can demand payment, but ultimately they must wait for the homeowner to sell the property before they can expect to be paid the money that they are owed according to the judgement. Luckily for the judgement lien holder, the court will typically assign an interest rate to these liens so that the lien holder is compensated for their waiting as the interest will continue to accrue until the debt is paid in full. Because the majority of people will live in their home for quite some time, the interest can make a judgement lien grow, and grow, and grow over the years so that it is quite large. Imagine what a lien of just $3,000 would grow to over the years if the interest rate were 15% annually and that would be an even bigger amount if the debt were $5,000 or $10,000! Of course, judgement liens require court action. A creditor will take the homeowner to court where the judge will determine if the homeowner does in fact owe the creditor any money. If the court decides that the creditor is owed the money, and the homeowner will not or cannot make payment, the judge will order that a judgement lien be placed...